Skip navigation

Finally, I finished reading this classic novel featuring Dr. Thorndyke.

The Stoneware Monkey is all about a man’s greed and its cover up.

First, there were two seemingly unrelated events: the murder of a constable in pursuit of a diamond thief and the attempt to poison a potter by using arsenic. The connection lies in the presence of Dr. Oldfield, a Dr. Thorndyke former student, who happened to find the constable body and served as the consulting physician of the potter.

Dr. Oldfield once again found a trace of murder: ashes of cremated human human body in the dustbin at the potter’s studio. This led to the (tentative) conclusion that the murdered person was the potter due to the existence of arsenic in the ash. The police tried to chase the supposedly real villain, the close friend of the potter, but end up in vain. Faced with these puzzling events, Dr. Thorndyke had his own hypotheses. His inquiries resulted in the discovery of the real felon while the secret was concealed in the hideous figurine of a stoneware monkey.

I gave this 3.5 star. I almost give up to finish the book because I feel it’s tedious, especially the first part, which is narrated by Dr. Oldfield. My curiosity and my fondness for Dr. Thorndyke traits are the main factor to bring me to its end. Anyway, the second part narration by Dr. Jervis is quite amusing.

Words worth noting 

  •  “I am relieved to hear that,” said I, “for I was most distressed to think
    of the terrible position that this poor lady finds herself in. I feel the deepest sympathy for her.”
  • “Very properly,” said Thorndyke, ” as her medical adviser, and I think I am disposed to agree with your view of the case. But we must be cautious. We must not take sides. In the words of a certain ecclesiastic, ‘we must keep a warm heart and a cool head.’ You will remember that when the arsenic poisoning occurred, both you and I, having regard to Mrs. Gannet’s relations with Boles, felt that she was a possible suspect, either as an accessory or a principal. That view was perfectly correct and I must remind you that nothing has changed since then. The general probabilities remain. I do not believe that she had any hand in this crime, but you and I may both be wrong. At any rate, the police will consider all the possibilities, and our business is to see that Mrs. Gannet gets absolutely fair treatment; and that we shall do.”
Advertisements

4 Comments

  1. hmmmmmmmmm

    I believe you have English very well

    • …and i hope yours is better than mine.
      i think the learned language will be lost if we never put it to use.


Silakan berkomentar ;)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: